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Pupil Premium

Please read the information below which gives details of our Disadvantaged Funding Grant. It will tell you how we use the funding and the impact it has on the children in terms of their learning. Our strategy is reviewed at the end of the Summer Term each year. The next review is due at the end of the Summer Term 2019.

Pupil Premium funding mainly applies to children on free school meals (FSM), but also those who are looked after children. At Langley this is a large group of pupils.

 

Academic Year 2017-18

 

Rec

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

Y6

Number

60

58

58

60

60

61

58

Disadvantaged

7

14

19

21

25

24

21

No of LAC

0

0

1

1

0

2

5

 

Total funding for this year:

 

2017-18

2018-19

£208,560

£194,040

 

How the Funding is spent at Langley.

The funding has been spent in the following ways:

  1. To provide a Learning Champion team of experienced staff (3LSPs) to support pupils who are at risk of falling behind in their learning in Year 2, Year3, Year4 and Year5.

Rationale: Some 80% of children in this grouping are in receipt of Disadvantaged Funding. This is a mixture of small group work and more individual pre-learning activities to prepare the child for later learning.

  1. To provide an experienced LSP to support and assess new arrivals to the school.

Rational: The vast majority of the children taken into school over the past three years were on FSM. Many were unsettled on arrival and approximately 80% were well below National Expectation or new to English.

  1. To provide mentoring for pupils who struggle to follow the school behaviour code.
  2. Rationale: This small group mainly are off track but it is their behaviour that is holding them back rather than struggling with learning.
  3. To provide a member of support staff to read regularly with Disdavantaged Funding Pupils (5 afternoons per week).

Rationale: School surveys show that this group of pupils are least likely to get regular time reading with their families and that it is their basic reading skills that are often holding them back in their work. In addition we have used this member of staff to work with Year5/6disadvantaged children who needed more support with comprehension.

  1. To provide individual reading support through volunteer readers (Better Reading Partnership)

Rationale: As above and used to supplement the member of support staff work. This is also a more relaxed approach that gives the children a little bit of more personal time with a caring adult.

  1. To provide support to families through SinglePoint Collaborative.

This is a collaboration of 4 local schools to provide an advice centre and access to family support workers for families who are just beginning to struggle. The aim of the activity is to stop families drifting into needing support from Children’s Services and becoming chaotic families. The centre also offers respite holiday provision for vulnerable families.

  1. Subsidising visits such as residential trips, class trips and to bring visitors into school (such as a pantomime company).

Rationale: to provide a wider life experience for pupils that many better off families take for granted.

  1. To provide new life experiences and life training for children on a Friday afternoon by employing a group called Skillsforce, who work with the children. They have been on trips to the Lickey Hills, rock climbing, etc… and camped overnight on the school field. Inaddition they gain a first aid qualification and a games leader qualification.

Rationale: to provide a wider life experience for pupils and help them gain skills which will prepare them for the future.

 

How do pupils who have Disadvantaged Funding do at Langley?

 

Disadvantaged v Non Disadvantaged Data

Year6 (21 pupils)

Attainment 2017-8(Children who are expected or better)

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

Disadvantaged

57%

57%

62%

Non Disadvantaged

83%

69%

78%

 

Progress (% shows where progress is compared to national data with 1 being the top 1% of schools and 100 being the bottom 1% of schools)

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

 

2015

2016

2017

2015

2016

2017

2015

2016

2017

Disadvantaged

19

17

12

20

15

22

15

21

54

Non Disadvantaged

30

10

11

14

18

20

16

17

47

 

In the 2017-8 cohort the attainment the non-disadvantaged outperformed the disadvantaged in all areas. This was mainly due to a high proportion of children with significant learning or social needs in that cohort group (4 LAC, 4 EHCP and a higher proportion of SEND pupils than across other cohorts children in this group). In terms of progress the pupils made similar progress in Maths and Reading, with many of the children making better than expected progress. The lower progress in Writing is explained by the higher percentage of SEND children in the Disadvantaged group (most of them specifically struggle in Writing and had additional support for this). Over the previous 3 years 2015-7 progress of this group of pupils was in the top 20% of school nationally.

 

Year 2 (19 pupils)

Attainment (achieving the Expected Standard or better)

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

Disadvantaged

84%

79%

79%

Non Disadvantaged

83%

81%

72%

 

  1. (making Expected or better progress) End of year 1- end of year2

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

Disadvantaged

95%

90%

95%

Non Disadvantaged

90%

91%

90%

 

In attainment at the end of KS1 the disadvantaged pupils achieve at a similar level to the non –disadvantaged in all areas. Their progress is similar in Reading but significantly better in Maths and Writing, (with 95% achieving expected or better progress). In analysis what is noticeable is that whilst some of the Disadvantaged funding pupils have not reached the expected standard a large number made significantly better than expected progress and are much closer to achieving Expected now.

 

Year 1 Phonics (14)

 

Phonics

Disadvantaged

71%

Non Disadvantaged

80%

(6 Boys and 8 Girls)

 

Reception (7 )

 

Achieving GLD %

Disadvantaged

57%

Non Disadvantaged

70%

 

This is a smaller group of pupils than in other year groups. Whilst there is a gap in attainment, the progress of the Disadvantaged pupils over the year was better than expected and they are closing the gap to where they need to be. Reading and Maths have improved the most with Writing needing to be continued to be monitored. In analysis girls do slightly better than boys.

 

Other Year Groups for year 2017-18

Attainment and Progress - End of Summer 2018 On Track

Year

Number

Reading

Writing

Maths

Non DF

DFund

Gap

Gap 2017

Progress

Non DF

DFund

Gap

Gap 2017

Progress

Non DF

DFund

Gap

Gap 2017

Progress

1

14

71

64

-7

 

 

70

71

+1

 

 

75

72

-3

 

 

2

19

82

77

-5

+11

 

69

79

+10

+22

 

82

83

+1

+11

 

3

21

77

67

-10

-10

 

67

52

-15

-16

 

78

71

-7

-7

 

4

25

76

80

+4

-12

 

64

64

0

-20

 

85

76

-9

-9

 

5

24

79

71

-8

-2

 

66

58

-8

+3

 

84

79

-5

-3

 

 

In attainment the gaps between the groups are quite small in most year groups (below 10%). In Y3 the gap is larger. To support these pupils we have restructured our staffing in Y4 and there is an additional teacher whose role it is to work with the pupils who are not on track. A disproportionate number of these are Disadvantaged Funding pupils and this smaller class will allow a more intensive approach to be taken to support these pupils to catch up.

 

Having said this the progress of our Disadvantaged Pupils across the school is Expected or better in every year group. It is not that they are falling further behind but that others are making even better progress and drawing further ahead in some areas.

 

Specific Projects (2017-18)

Learning Champion project.

This has been running for 6 years now. It should be remembered that these pupils are the ones who are identified as falling behind and will have made more limited progress in the previous year.

Progress

 

Maths (expected or better progress)

Reading (expected or better progress)

Writing (expected or better progress)

Year2

 

 

 

Year3

 

 

 

Year5

 

 

 

In all year groups learning champion children have made expected or better progress. This is due to the Learning Champion individualising learning.

 

To provide an experienced LSP to support and assess new arrivals to the school.

Out of 17 new arrivals this year7 were disadvantaged children. All have settled quickly into school routine and are continuing to be monitored. Six of the seven children came in at well below and are making good progress. The other disadvantaged child is also making good progress.

 

To provide mentoring for pupils who struggle after a bereavement and pupils who struggle to follow the school behaviour code.

Mentoring has proven very effective again. The minor behaviour problems are swiftly ‘nipped in the bud’ by weekly mentoring and the behaviour policy. During the year 33 disadvantaged children had pastoral support for varying issues (behaviour, attendance, bereavement, anger issues, social and emotional support and family problems).

 

To provide a member of support staff to read regularly with Disdadvantaged Funding Pupils (am only).

This programme was amended to meet the needs of individual pupils. After February half term it was agreed that some of the children targeted for reading needed further help with comprehension activities – individualised programmes were put in place for Year6 and Year5 children – all children have made progress.

 

To provide individual reading support through volunteer readers (Better Reading Partnership)

This has continued to be successful as it provides the emotional coaching needed for these children and the chance to develop a love of reading.

 

To provide support to families through SinglePoint.

We had 29 families who were working with Single Point, 10 of those were disadvantaged families. The service has provided family support workers to make contact and work with the families and in some cases counselling for the children who need it (this is done in the renovated house and is a nice quiet and stable environment)). In all cases the involvement has brought stability to the children involved which is reflected in the children’s behaviour and attendance at school.

 

 

Subsidising visits such as residential trips, class trips and to bring visitors into school (such as a pantomime company).

This is a practice which we have continued on an individual basis and when we see there is a need. The children and families who benefit from this practise receive experiences that they may not have been able to have. The children had access to a visiting Pantomime show and several visiting educational visits. SinglePoint also encourages some of our families to attend trips and experiences throughout the year.

 

Skillforce

This project ran across two half years – one half year with a Year 6 group and the other with a Year 5 group. In terms of the pupil social skills both groups were reported as having shown increased independence and ability to cope with a variety of situations. The children really enjoyed the project, with many asking if it could continue for them. Incidents of poor behaviour also reduced for this group during and after the project.

Academically the children who took part almost all made at least expected progress, with several making better than expected progress.

 

Skill force has provided these children with many first hand experiences such as trips to the Lickey Hills etc… building up to a camping experience on the main field. For the majority of children that took part these were first time experiences. These experiences have enriched their learning in all areas and has improved attendance – we continue to monitor the attendance, progress and attainment of these children on a half term basis.

 

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